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Internet Connection Booster 2000 v3.5.0 (Final)

Version 3.5.0 (Final Release)

 

What is Internet Connection Booster? | How Does It Work? | Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) | Maximum Segment Size and Receive Window | Time To Live | Screen Shot | Download


 

What is Internet Connection Booster?

Internet Connection Booster 2000 is a utility that can improve the speed at which you browse, send and receive email, and download files from the Internet. Internet Connection Booster 2000 adjusts and modifies the various "hidden" configuration parameters used by the Internet protocol (TCP/IP) under Windows 95 and 98. By default, the Internet settings in both Windows 95 and 98 do not come optimized for people accessing the Internet with a Dial-Up or Modem connection, but instead come optimized for In-House Networks (LAN's). By adjusting and optimizing these settings, Internet Connection Booster 2000 can improve the performance of all your Internet-related software.

How Does It Work?

For some unknown reason, Windows 95 uses only default settings of 1500 for MaxMTU, 8192 for RWIN, 32 for TTL, which are generally inefficient for dialup Internet connections. Internet Connection Booster 2000 is designed to automatically change certain Windows default settings to eliminate fragmentation of data packets promoting faster Internet data transfer rates. This translates into faster browsing, quicker downloads, and improved Internet performance.

All data on the Internet is broken into what are called packets (also called datagrams). Each TCP packet consists of a 40 byte header, which includes routing information, and the actual data that is being sent or received (called the data segment). Unless the sender and receiver of that data are on the same network, the packet must be routed through one or more intermediary systems which are responsible for forwarding it on to it's ultimate destination. And because of the nature of the Internet, there is no guarantee that two packets, both having the same sender and destination, will follow the same route.

 

What is Internet Connection Booster? | How Does It Work? | Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) | Maximum Segment Size and Receive Window | Time To Live | Screen Shot | Download


 

Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU)

Each of these intermediary hosts are configured to handle what is called a Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU), which is the number of bytes that it will send as one packet. When a host receives a packet that is larger than it's MTU, it will break the large packet into multiple smaller ones, each with their own header and data (which is then reassembled by the receiver). Every time a connection is opened between two computers on the Internet, they must agree on an MTU. This is done by comparing both of their MTUs and selecting the smaller of the two. If the MTU is set too large for routers that are between the computers, these routers then fragment this information into a packet size that the router can handle. This fragmentation can double the amount of time it takes to send a single packet. For example, if your computer has an MTU of 1500 and sends a 1500 packet to a router with an MTU of 576, the packet will exceed the router's MTU, so it is split into three separate packets and forwarded on. Since 1500 is not evenly divisible by 576, the third packet only contains the last fragment of the original packet. And since each packet must be acknowledged by the receiver, this kind of fragmentation can have a noticeably negative effect on your connection speed.

 

Time To Live

Last, but not least, each IP packet contains an 8-bit header field that specifies the Time To Live (TTL) for that packet. Implemented as a safeguard against packets looping between routers, it specifies the maximum number of routers that the packet may be forwarded through to it's destination. Each time the packet is forwarded the TTL value is decremented by one, and if the value drops to zero, the packet is rejected. If this happens, ideally an ICMP (Internet Control Message Protocol) packet is be sent to the receiver, indicating that the TTL expired and it's value would be dynamically adjusted for retransmission. In reality, however, this is rarely implemented and most systems are configured with a fixed value of around 30.

Download

Internet Connection Booster 2000 v3.5.0 (Final)
FULL VERSION

Internet Connection Booster 2000.zip
ZIP File Size: 488.840 byte

Download Internet Connection Booster 2000 NOW!!!

Internet Connection Booster Help.zip
ZIP File Size: 11.048 byte


Internet Connection Booster 2000 v3.5.0 (Final)
Need VB 4.0 Runtime (VB40032.DLL)

Internet Connection Booster 2000.zip
ZIP File Size: 171.007 byte

 

Some TIPS

Before or After installing Internet Connection Booster 2000, try to Increase the Communication Port (COM1, COM2 etc.) to the Maximum Bits Per Second (19200, 115000 etc.) you'll find this in the Device Manager Tabs under System Properties. Also try to change the Type of Machine (Desktop Computer, Mobile or Docking System, Network Server) to Network Server, you'll find this in System Properties - Performance - File System.

Maximum Segment Size (MSS) and Receive Window (RWIN)

When a TCP connection is being established, the sender and requester negotiate the maximum data segment size that will be accepted by both hosts. This value, called the Maximum Segment Size (MSS) is different from the MTU because it only addresses the maximum size of the data portion of the packet, and does not include the header. If each data segment, along with the header, does not exceed the smallest MTU as it is being routed to it's destination, then it will not be fragmented. Therefore, because the size of a TCP header is 40 bytes, the MSS is calculated as MTU minus 40. In turn, the MSS value is useful in determining the size of the receive window (RWIN), which is the maximum number of bytes of data that can be buffered, pending the receipt of an acknowledgment packet back from the sender. Typically, the RWIN value should be a multiple of 2-10 times the MSS value. For example, a good RWIN value for a system with an MTU of 576 (and an MSS of 536) would be 2144 (536 * 4).

 

Screen Shot

Internet Connection Booster 2000 Screen Shot

Internet Connection Booster 2000 Screen Shot

 

 

For the Complete Information about Boosting Up your Internet Connection, Please download the
Internet Connection Booster Help

 

 

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What is Internet Connection Booster? | How Does It Work? | Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) | Maximum Segment Size and Receive Window | Time To Live | Screen Shot | Download


 

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